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Air and Space
Air and space museums and displays, Washington, D.C., 1999-2004. Click on any image to load larger image and start slide show.
1903 Wright Flyer, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999. 1903 Wright Flyer above Apollo 11 command capsule Columbia, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999. Apollo 11 command capsule Columbia, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999. Spirit of St. Louis, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999. X-1 Glamorous Glennis, rocket plane which broke the sound barrier, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999. X-15 Mach 6 rocket plane, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999.
Milestones of flight, clockwise from top, the X-1 that broke the sound barrier, the X-15 rocket plane that flew at Mach 6, the Wright Flyer, the Apollo 11 command capsule Columbia, a replica of the Viking Mars lander, and the Spirit of St. Louis, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 1999. Spirit of St. Louis, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 2001. 1903 Wright Flyer, National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 2001. The 1903 Wright Flyer in its centennial display at the National Air and Space Museum, Washington, 2004. The Enola Gay at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Dulles Airport in Chantilly, Va., a new branch of the National Air and Space Museum, 2004.  The Enola Gay is credited with saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of US servicemen in WWII. At the new Air and Space museum, this unflown Mercury capsule was for a 1963 Alan Shepard mission, but NASA decided instead to end the Mercury program and move on to Gemini.  It was named Friendship 7 II after Shepard’s original 1961 capsule.
At the new Air and Space museum, the Space Shuttle Enterprise, which was used for approach and landing tests during development of the shuttle program. SR-71 Blackbird, fastest operational airplane in history.  In the background is the Space Shuttle Enterprise. X-35B Joint Strike Fighter at the new Air and Space Museum. An early predecessor to the B-2 is this Northrop Flying Wing from 1940. There was no place to display it until the new Air and Space Museum branch was built in Virginia. Before Pathfinder and Explorer there were the two Viking landers, which landed on Mars and returned photos in 1976.  National Air and Space Museum, Washington. Full scale Mars rover, National Geographic Society, 2004.
Closeup of the main camera boom, Mars rover, National Geographic Society, 2004.

 
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